Noon Concert: East of Westreville

When:
June 2, 2017 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
2017-06-02T12:00:00-05:00
2017-06-02T13:00:00-05:00
Where:
Old Courthouse Museum
200 W. 6th St.
Sioux Falls
SD 57104
Cost:
Free

East of Westrevillie

 

 

East of Westreville
Old Time Mix of Music & Memories

East of Westreville is a talented group featuring Boyd Bristow (Acoustic Christmas) on lead acoustic guitar and vocals, Brian Bonde (The Cardigans) on rhythm acoustic guitar and vocals, Kaija Bonde (Always…Patsy Cline) on vocals, and Al Slaathaug on string bass and vocals.

An “EOW” show intertwines good “old-timey” music with homespun humor, and an occasional special guest. It’s an ever-changing mix of music and memories, reminiscent of the days when all that was needed for entertainment was a Philco radio and a comfy chair.

Over a century ago, the Westre Clan claimed a little spot on Frog Creek Road. The Clay County, South Dakota crossroads, where the remains of Westreville now lie, stand as a symbol for what we will always sing about: family, love, God and faith. It’s about the people who have gone before, people from small towns and farms, people like our parents and grandparents. We try to hold on to the old ways, and those people, as much as possible.  We can never go back, but we can sing about it. What started as one song in church in 2001 has since turned into a whole collection of songs, gigs and towns too numerous to count. . .  “That’s why we came.”

East of Westreville is a talented group featuring Boyd Bristow (Acoustic Christmas) on lead acoustic guitar and vocals, Brian Bonde (The Cardigans) on rhythm acoustic guitar and vocals, Kaija Bonde (Always…Patsy Cline) on vocals, and Al Slaathaug on string bass and vocals.

An “EOW” show intertwines good “old-timey” music with homespun humor, and an occasional special guest. It’s an ever-changing mix of music and memories, reminiscent of the days when all that was needed for entertainment was a Philco radio and a comfy chair.

Over a century ago, the Westre Clan claimed a little spot on Frog Creek Road. The Clay County, South Dakota crossroads, where the remains of Westreville now lie, stand as a symbol for what we will always sing about: family, love, God and faith. It’s about the people who have gone before, people from small towns and farms, people like our parents and grandparents. We try to hold on to the old ways, and those people, as much as possible.  We can never go back, but we can sing about it. What started as one song in church in 2001 has since turned into a whole collection of songs, gigs and towns too numerous to count. . .  “That’s why we came.”